NEWBY & COLD COTES from CLAPHAM

 


Summary

Date - 13th March 2016 Distance - 8.25 miles
Ascent -
870ft
Map - OL2 Start point - Clapham car park (SD 7460 6921)

 

Summits Achieved

No summits were reached on this walk

 

Preface

All was well, as we had steaming mugs in paw and delicious cakes on the plates.

"The peach and apricot slice is scrumptious, Little Eric", said Tetley.

"And the chocolate caramel shortbread is to die for, Grizzly", went on Shaun.

"You're welcome pals", they both replied.

"It seems ages since we had a walk", commented Southey.

"Well Dad has been very busy, and of course he and Uncle Brian have been away at their second home, Armathwaite Hall", pointed out Allen.

Little Eric had got the iPad in paw, and said, "I'm sure Dad will be free this weekend." Then after a few taps, he went on. "Sunday looks to be the best day for the weather."

Let's come up with a plan", went on Shaun, "then Allen can go and ask Dad."

"I know what will help to convince Dad", said Allen. "Being able to go for a snack at Elaine's at Feizor, afterwards."

"So how about we see if we can find an area we have not walked before, starting from Clapham", suggested Shaun.

"I'll get OL2", said Tetley, trotting off to the map draw.

This was soon spread out, and Clapham located. "No good looking east as we have done those paths many times", said Tetley.

"So west then", replied Allen.

"There is the old road to Ingleton that we have never walked, so part of that could be included", suggested Grizzly.

"If we make that the return route, we need to be south of that outward", went on Southey.

"Here", pointed Shaun. "We could take the track called Laithbutts Lane to the village of Newby, which I am sure we have never visited before."

"Yes", agreed Tetley. "Then we take the path to Goat Gap and on and on to Greenwood Leghe, and up to the road."

"It will make for a long long return on the road", said Little Eric. "Look, there are some paths that could take us in a loop to the south making the return more interesting."

"Sounds like a plan", said Southey, who had the highlight pen in paw to mark the route.

Allen picked up the map, saying, "I'll see what Dad thinks."

As he trotted out, Tetley said, "can I have another mug of tea, and while you're at it you had better fill Allen's too."

"Sure pal."

Allen was a little while returning. "Sorry, but Dad was on the phone. He likes our suggestion, and is pleased we will be covering new ground."

"Great", cheered Southey, "I can't wait."

 

The Walk

We did not need to be up too early, but nevertheless we made sure the picnic was made and packed in good time. Hearing Dad slam the car boot shut for the last time, we quickly dashed out and settled on the front seat, calling out goodbyes to Uncle Brian and Gladly. They were busy with the Telegraph crossword.

The day was mild and rather cloudy, so the views were misty, but the cold edge to the breeze told us it was still early spring.

As we arrived at the large car park, as well as cars there were two coaches of walkers, who rather inconsiderately were blocking the road causing Dad to have to cross the rough ground behind.

"Oh I hope and pray they are not going our way", implored Tetley.

They were milling about while Dad was getting ready, then the leader called them to order and took them off in the direction of Austwick the complete opposite to our planned route.

"Thank goodness for that", said Grizzly, with relief in his voice.

We and Dad are a solitary lot, and our perfect walk is to see no other people at all. This means peace and solitude, particularly for Dad away from the usual hustle and bustle.

Ready now Dad strode off going left from the car park and then right across the beck, to soon go right along Crosshaw Lane that is the start of the old road to Ingleton.

Soon the houses were left Southey calling out, "that's an unusual street name. "Perhaps as well we are not going that way with Dad's big feet", he laughed

"That's a bit cheeky pal", replied Allen.

"It's not all that far until we go off left on Laithbutts Lane", called out Shaun,

"After about 100 yards, Southey called out, "that must be it by the signpost."

Along here Dad strode a stream, and then via gates crossed pastures. Another gate led into a fenced/walled grassy track...

...to a gate and then pass the buildings of Laithbutts, where the track continued on and on to finally reach a gate onto the road at Newby.

Along here we heard the distinct cry of the curlew. "Lovely", remarked Tetley.

"Look", called out Allen. "Donkeys. Reminds me of the two Elaine has that are named after you and Uncle Brian."

"Aye" laughed Dad. "When she first got them, she told Uncle Brian that she was still thinking what to call them."

His reply was "well as long as it is not Brian and Gerry!"

"A silly thing to say really", commented Tetley.

A short way brought us to the pretty village, where the first house dated from 1720.

Typically the houses surround a wide green...

...these ducks dabbling by the tiny stream.

The chapel dates from 1873, by which was a seat. "Please take our picture for the story", said Shaun.

"OK lads, get settled then", replied Dad.

Walking out of the village, Shaun said, "there is a sharp bend, and there we go right."

This was through a gate to then walk by the wall on left and through the gate ahead, to then climb this gated stone step stile at wall corner.

Then it was slightly right across the top of the field to a step stile and then another at end of next field by a clump of trees. After crossing the access to Scale Mire the path went on with the wall on right to then climb a stile in it and continue in the same direction to a stile in the cross wall. After a waymarked gate we crossed the fields, more stiles allowing progress and passing the forlorn ruin of this farmhouse and barn.

Finally the last field on this section was crossed to a stile behind this tree, to a road.

Beyond is Cold Cotes Waste, an area of rough unkempt moor. This was crossed on a narrow trod to cross a small footbridge and then the stone step stile at a meeting of walls. Now crossed the pasture keeping right of a barn to a gate.

"The route bears left to a footbridge and then a stile in the wall on the left", said Shaun.

From here we crossed the moorland right, and so reach Green Lane, via a wooden step stile.

"Where to now?", asked Southey.

"We should cross the road and take that wide surfaced track to Greenwood Leghe caravan park", instructed Shaun.

As we neared the caravans, the path skirted the site to the left along the fence, to eventually bend right and into the park.

"It must be uphill along the tarmac road", said Tetley.

This led to the reception and a road right, and shortly left along a waymarked walled path to a stile, and then on keeping by the hedge on right. More stiles then allowed progress over the fields to Yarlsber Farm.

There were sheep too and despite Allen's protestations, as we approached the farm, Dad could not resist snapping this.

Passing the farm there were then more fields and stiles the last taking us on to the old road. We stopped here to have our picnic being able to take our time as Dad took the opportunity to ring Uncle Brian.

"Have you finished", asked Dad,

"Yes", replied Allen. "I was getting hungry, but am now fully refreshed.

"You're always hungry", laughed Tetley. "Just like Dad."

So now strolled right along the road passing houses called Slatenber, Holly Platt and Duck Dub. The owner of the latter was outside and Dad had a chat about walking.

He also asked, "did you watch the Jericho television series."

This is based on one of the shanty towns for the navvies building the Ribblehead Viaduct. Dad replied "yes"

He then said, "after the first episode, on the following the weekend it was packed round Ribblehead! We quite liked the programme, but it did not quite get the true feel of how the real conditions would have been."

"A bit too sanitised", agreed Dad.

Leaving, Dad said,"nice to have met you", and we then continued on.

"We are looking for a path off right over the wall", said Shaun.

"Here it is", called out Little Eric, after a while as he spotted the signpost.

This pointed diagonally left through a gate and on to another then over the field to the road. Here turned right to buildings and then took the signed walled track left. This led to a choice of gates.

Shaun said, "the one to the right is the actual route, but it will be more direct to take the left."

Strolled on to a gate and on with the wall to the left to a gap stile and footbridge in the cross wall.

These days, at times, poor Allen gets wound up by Southey about sheep pictures and today was no exception. "Dad, that sheep is posing to have his picture taken.

"Hmph", grumped Allen. "We have already had one for the story at Yarlsber Farm."

The path now drifted right to this daddy of a step stile. "Not exactly what I wanted to be faced with from my knees point of view, towards the end of the walk", remarked Dad.

Ahead we went a bit right to gain a track and so go left through a gate and across the field to regain road, turning right to return towards Clapham that we could see spread out below.

Reaching the village again on Crosshaw Lane, Shaun suggested, "by way of a little variation, we could take this narrow ginnel to bring us to the road by Clapham Beck."

OK lad", agreed Dad.

Here is the beck looking upstream...

...crossed via the narrow Broken Bridge.

"That was a most enjoyable walk", said Allen.

"Absolutely", agreed Tetley, "and over completely new ground too, in an area that we have walked extensively over the years."

"So to Elaine's?", asked Grizzly.

"Yes lad."

"Can we come in too?", asked Little Eric.

"Of course."

Here Dad had a delicious fruit scone with butter and jam, and a scrumptious piece of chocolate caramel shortbread, washed down with a pot of tea. When time allowed Elaine came and chatted which was nice.

As we walked to the car we espied this little lamb. "Ahh", said Southey.

"Oh go on then", replied Allen in exasperation.

A grand day!

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